Inner London pay offer as a percentage

This is the pay offer of £2355 for inner London Council’s and what it looks like as a percentage of your current salary and the level of kind of pay cut based on RPI indexed inflation of 14.5% (July 2022)

Salary £PercentageCompared to inflation
(level of wage cut)
Grade
2241610.51– 3.99SCALE 1/2
2259910.42-4.26
2300410.24-4.26
2342110.06-4.44
238389.88-4.62 SCALE 3
242709.70-4.8
247059.53-4.97SCALE 4
251529.36-5.14
256019.20-5.3
260629.04-5.46
265328.88-5.62
270098.72-5.78SCALE 5
274978.56-5.94
279918.41-6.09
284958.26-6.24
290088.12-6.38
295307.97-6.53
300617.83-6.67SCALE 6
306047.70-6.8
311547.56-6.94
317157.43-7.07
322867.29-7.21
328667.17-7.33S.O.1
334587.04-7.46
340606.91-7.59
346706.79-7.71
352966.67-7.83
356816.60-7.9S.O.2
365786.44-8.06
372596.32-8.18
381476.17-8.33P.O.2
391156.02-8.48
401535.87-8.63
413435.70-8.8
423355.56-8.94
433555.43-9.07
443625.31-9.19P.O.4
453785.19-9.31
463925.08-9.42
473504.97-9.53
484004.87-9.63
494264.76-9.74P.O.6
504494.67-9.83
514444.58-9.92
524694.49-10.01
534894.40-10.1P.O.7
545124.32-10.18
555524.24-10.26
566394.16-10.34
577474.08-10.42
588494.00-10.5 P.O.8
599423.93-10.57
610383.86-10.64
621243.79-10.71
632333.72-10.78
643133.66-10.84P.O.9
654123.60-10.9
665263.54-10.96
675983.48-11.02P.O.9
687033.43-11.07

Five ways to help with the local government pay campaign

Local government workers deserve higher pay! Here is how we can get this campaign started before any potential ballot for strike action.

1 Email your local councillor
Local councillors can voice their support for a pay rise for council and school staff directly with local government employers. Please email your councillor and convince them to use their influence to support the pay claim. We’ve created a ready to send email that you can send at the click of a button, just visit:
action.unison.org.uk/page/105299/action/

2 Ask your colleagues to join UNISON
We’re stronger together. Check if your colleagues are members of UNISON and if they aren’t, show them how they can join – it only takes 5 minutes: join.unison.org.uk

3 Make sure your details are up to date
Check MyUNISON to make sure that we have the right contact information for you, as you don’t want important information on this campaign to go to the wrong place. You may be balloted by post and if your address is wrong then you could lose your chance to vote!
Head to: http://www.unison.org.uk/my-unison

4 Follow us on social media
Check out our facebook and twitter profiles to have your say on pay and get all of the latest up to date information on this campaign.
facebook.com/LambethUNISON
twitter.com/LambethUNISON – remember to mention #WeNeedMore

5 Prepare for the consultation
Make sure you’re ready to have your say when we ask for your view on the final pay offer. Talk to colleagues and really think about the pay rise you need so you can make an informed decision on whether to accept the offer or not. We might be offered 4% – but with inflation at 11% do you want to accept what is in effect a 7% ay cut?

Council workers deserve decent pay

The national employers council for Local Government has offered Council workers a 1.75% pay increase for most staff and 2.75% for lower graded staff.

UNISON is rejecting this derisory offer which is below inflation and in no way makes up for over a decade of below inflation pay ‘increases’. UNISON is arguing for 10% for all staff. This would go some way to improving the lives of dedicated local government workers who have sacrificed so much and worked so hard even through the pandemic.

You can read more about the pay campaign for 10% below

Council staff who kept local services and schools running deserve a real pay rise

And for more details and why you should vote to REJECT the offer in the forthcoming ballot please click on the link below

What it means to be Black in Lambeth

Before me, my older sister worked in Lambeth and because of her I spent a great deal of time around Lambeth and Lambeth staff. Evenings of Black and white staff together – from the cleaners to directors – all with one thing in common, they were all Lambeth. I loved it and knew I was Lambeth at heart. I pursued every possibility of employment in the Borough. In October 2002 to my absolute delight I got a job in Central Rehousing Services. I now realise that I had unfortunately arrived at the tail end of an era of positive change for Black staff in Lambeth. Soon the Council entered a state of permanent restructuring and the unwilling exodus of many senior Black managers and many white colleagues who were no longer seen as fitting new Lambeth.

For the first few years I thoroughly enjoyed my employment and felt that I was able to positively contribute to effecting change for Lambeth residents. However, as the Council changed so too did my working life and my resolve to do what was necessary to challenge the devastating effects of restructures. The main purpose of many restructures seemed to be the removal of large numbers of staff, primarily Black staff.  In anger at the destruction of services to tenants and the loss of increasing numbers of respected colleagues, I became a Unison shop steward.

As members of staff we are able to identify inequality and injustice in our workplaces however, as a shop steward these are magnified because of representing numerous cases of staff subjected to unjust and unequal treatment. Only then did I recognise scale of the problems facing the Borough that I had longed to work for. It was also at this point that I started facing personal consequences for challenging institutional racism. Until 2007 my employment had been without blemish, even receiving an award at a staff conference. But following a contentious restructure which required forthright action to redress inequality, I found myself subject to the full force of the organisation’s wrath. I faced several years of continuous disciplinary action, including criminal prosecution on faked evidence. With resilience and a commitment to outlast those responsible, I am still here in Lambeth and they are gone. I recommend this course of action to all staff when faced with adversity!

As the daughter one of the first civil rights leaders in the United Kingdom I am only too aware of the way institutional racism works. For instance, my father, Michael X was directly responsible helping to bring about the very first race equality legislation but was ironically the first to be imprisoned under this legislation. This would mark the beginning of a long and concerted effort by the State to vilify and penalise Michael X for challenging the outright, violent racist attacks faced by the Windrush generation.

Ultimately, even after leaving the UK to escape State sponsored hate, the consequences of race hate followed, and Michael X was executed in Trinidad with the support and assistance of the British Privy Council.  But this was not the end. The State had not yet completed what it had set out to do. Information relating to a Black Civil Rights movement in the UK is notable only by its absence. The State erased our history and our children do not know and are not taught the history of their proud past and those who, along with Michael X, fought so we could have better lives.

My background prepared me for adversity and gave me an advantage – resilience and a profound understanding of how the system works to destabilise Black progression, while giving a false impression of cooperating in the fight for equality. I am also committed to ensuring that our history and presence in Lambeth is carved in stone.

I, along with my amazing UNISON colleagues have fought for the rights and continued presence of Black staff in Lambeth. We are not a minority! We are many and they are few, and though we struggle for equality Lambeth Black staff have demonstrated our power! That fighting spirit that kept our rebellious ancestors going for hundreds of years, courses through our veins!

To be Black in Lambeth means being alert to the possibility of recrimination for raising concerns generally, worse if our concerns relate to issues of race discrimination.

But together we know our collective POWER and are not afraid to assert it

To be Black in Lambeth means sitting in offices that are sometimes segregated along racial lines.

Yet our shared history in Lambeth is marked by our standing together at demonstrations and strike action for collective rights of ALL workers

To be Black in Lambeth means our white colleagues can work from home or Starbucks without having to plead and bargain for this right, as we have had to.

Through our lasting friendships we support each other emotionally and even financially in times of hardship

To be Black in Lambeth means being micromanaged so that even the time for toilet breaks are be monitored.

We won’t be worn down! Outside work we party together, attend weddings, special events and funerals of our colleagues, who are also friends

To be Black in Lambeth means knowing that the young white man who has arrived as an administrative officer will soon be our boss.

Yet we continue to hold Lambeth dear to our hearts and are committed to fighting for a better Lambeth. Our Lambeth that once saw better days and will again.

UNISON and parents’ response to the proposal to cut children’s centre provisions in Lambeth

We thank all the professionals and families who helped produce A Better Plan. We also drew heavily on research into the sector. We have tried to acknowledge sources and authors where appropriate but this has been balanced with requested anonymity and desire to keep the document readable for its purposes. We publish this response in order to add to community discussion on the closure of Lambeth’s Children’s Centre.

Read A Better Plan online. Please contact your councillors about this issue and add your voice to the campaign!